Speech Therapy

 

Speech Therapy for Autism

Speech-language therapy can help people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) improve their abilities to communicate and interact with others.

Verbal Skills

This type of therapy can help some people improve their spoken or verbal skills, such as:

  • Correctly naming people and things
  • Better explaining feelings and emotions
  • Using words and sentences better
  • Improving the rate and rhythm of speech

Speech Therapy can also help with:

  • Strengthening the muscles in the mouth, jaw and neck
  • Making clearer speech sounds
  • Matching emotions with the correct facial expression
  • Understanding body language
  • Responding to questions
  • Matching a picture with its meaning

Nonverbal Communication

Speech-language therapy can also teach nonverbal communication skills, such as:

  • Using hand signals or sign language
  • Using picture symbols to communicate (Picture Exchange Communication System)

Speech-language therapy activities can also include ways to improve social skills and social behaviors. For example, a child might learn how to make eye contact or to stand at a comfortable distance from another person. These skills make it a little easier to interact with others.

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What does the CDC say about Autism?

Autism Diagnosis CDC

Diagnosing ASD can be difficult since there is no medical test, like a blood test, to diagnose the disorders. Doctors look at the child’s behavior and development to make a diagnosis.

ASD can sometimes be detected at 18 months or younger. By age 2, a diagnosis by an experienced professional can be considered very reliable. However, many children do not receive a final diagnosis until much older. This delay means that children with ASD might not get the early help they need.

ASD Treatment CDC

There is currently no cure for ASD. However, research shows that early intervention treatment services can improve a child’s development. Early intervention services help children from birth to 3 years old (36 months) learn important skills. Services can include therapy to help the child talk, walk, and interact with others. Therefore, it is important to talk to your child’s doctor as soon as possible if you think your child has ASD or other developmental problem.

Even if your child has not been diagnosed with an ASD, he or she may be eligible for early intervention treatment services. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)external icon says that children under the age of 3 years (36 months) who are at risk of having developmental delays may be eligible for services. These services are provided through an early intervention system in your state. Through this system, you can ask for an evaluation.

In addition, treatment for particular symptoms, such as speech therapy for language delays, often does not need to wait for a formal ASD diagnosis.

Causes and Risk Factors CDC

We do not know all of the causes of ASD. However, we have learned that there are likely many causes for multiple types of ASD. There may be many different factors that make a child more likely to have an ASD, including environmental, biologic and genetic factors.

  • Most scientists agree that genes are one of the risk factors that can make a person more likely to develop ASD.
  • Children who have a sibling with ASD are at a higher risk of also having ASD. 
  • Individuals with certain genetic or chromosomal conditions, such as fragile X syndrome or tuberous sclerosis, can have a greater chance of having ASD. 
  • When taken during pregnancy, the prescription drugs valproic acid and thalidomide have been linked with a higher risk of ASD.
  • There is some evidence that the critical period for developing ASD occurs before, during, and immediately after birth. 
  • Children born to older parents are at greater risk for having ASD.

ASD continues to be an important public health concern. Like the many families living with ASD, CDC wants to find out what causes the disorder. Understanding the factors that make a person more likely to develop ASD will help us learn more about the causes. We are currently working on one of the largest U.S. studies to date, called Study to Explore Early Development (SEED). SEED is looking at many possible risk factors for ASD, including genetic, environmental, pregnancy, and behavioral factors.

Who is Affected? CDC

ASD occurs in all racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups, but is about 4 times more common among boys than among girls.

For over a decade, CDC’s Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network has been estimating the number of children with ASD in the United States. We have learned a lot about how many U. S. children have ASD. It will be important to use the same methods to track how the number of children with ASD is changing over time in order to learn more about the disorder.

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Speech Therapy

Speech-language therapy activities can also include ways to improve social skills and social behaviors. For example, a child might learn how to make eye contact or to stand at a comfortable distance from another person.

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Terre Haute, Indiana 47802

Email us: info@harshaautism.com

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